Fighting flyaway

When the air is dry or there's low humidity, hair loses water to the surrounding air and dries out. Dry hair builds up negative electricity (hair is predominantly negatively charged to begin with) and all those negative charges repel neighboring hairs, resulting in flyaway. Fine hair tends to get flyaway more than super thick locks because if individual hairs repel one another it's more obvious to the eye when hair is sparse. Sparse hair also dries out more quickly.

Most flyaway problems occur in the winter when their own static electricity. The simplest way to eliminate flyaway is to add water back and avoid products that tend to dry out hair.

DO shampoo your hair with a moisturizing or conditioning shampoo.
DO use a cream rinse after shampooing. Cream rinses reduce static electricity and flyaway because they keep hair from getting too dry.
DON'T overuse heat styling appliances. Using a blow-dryer everyday on a hot setting and then wrapping your hair in hot rollers will only dam-flyaway. Avoid heat damage by using a warm set ting on your blow-dryer, hold it away from your head as you dry hair, and keep the blow-dryer moving.
DON'T apply heavy gels to hair. Even though gels can weigh hair down, too much can have a dry
DO use a humectant (water attracting) styling product.
DON'T use styling sprays with alcohol. There are many products available that are alcohol-free.
DO use natural bristle brushes - they reduce fly away. Plastic bristles create more negative charges.
DON'T overuse hairspray. The old trick of spraying your hair or your brush with hairspray to tame static doesn't provide a quick fix, it just dries out hair
DO use a humidifier in your home.
DO mist hair with water. Carry a travel-size spray bottle with you or keep one in your desk to combat dry office air.
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